Celebrate the Feast of St. Catherine of Siena with an Octave of Prayer

April 29 – The Feast of St. Catherine of Siena 
Loving and Faithful God, we praise your glory in the graced life of St. Catherine of Siena, Dominican, virgin and Doctor of the Church. As she spoke fearlessly to heads of the Church and the State, may we also be unafraid to speak God’s peace boldly to those in power. St. Catherine of Siena is a patroness of the Dominican Sisters of Peace. Through her merits and her intercession, we pray that we may attain her wisdom, her generosity of spirit, and her longing always to be closer to Christ. We ask this through Jesus, your Son, in the unity of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

Concluding Prayer
Our Father
Hail Mary
Glory Be
St Catherine of Siena, pray for us.

 

April 30
Loving and Faithful God, we praise your glory in the justice-seeking life of St. Catherine of Siena, Dominican, virgin and Doctor of the Church. She helped bring unity in her home country of Italy and spoke peace to nations at war. We ask you Lord through her merits and intercession to hear our prayer.  As Catherine is the patron of Europe, we pray for peace on that continent, and especially for the people of Ukraine. We ask this through Jesus, your Son, in the unity of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

Concluding Prayer
Our Father
Hail Mary
Glory Be
St Catherine of Siena, pray for us.

 

 

May 1
Loving and Faithful God, we praise your glory in the compassionate life of St. Catherine of Siena, Dominican, virgin and Doctor of the Church. Help us to serve as she did, offering our hands and our hearts to the needy of our day just as St. Catherine cared for those ill from the plague of her time.  As the patron of nurses, we ask for St. Catherine’s intercession for those who care for the sick, the wounded, and the dying. May they find strength, hope and peace to sustain them in this holy, compassionate work. We ask this through Jesus, your Son, in the unity of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

Concluding Prayer
Our Father
Hail Mary
Glory Be
St Catherine of Siena, pray for us.

 

 

May 2
Loving and Faithful God, we praise your glory in the passionate life of the admirable St. Catherine of Siena, Dominican, virgin, and Doctor of the Church. St. Catherine was said to have been praying in the middle of a terrible fire. By God’s grace, she escaped the danger of the flames. St. Catherine is the patron saint of fire prevention.  Lord of Love, through her intercession, set our hearts afire as we pray for our earth and work to preserve and honor the gift you have given us in our own essence and that of creation around us. We ask for her prayers for those suffering from the many fires caused by climate change. We ask this through Jesus, your Son, in the unity of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

Concluding Prayer
Our Father
Hail Mary
Glory Be
St Catherine of Siena, pray for us.

 

 

May 3
Loving and Faithful God, we praise your glory in the merciful life of the St. Catherine of Siena, Dominican, virgin, and Doctor of the Church. St. Catherine was one of 25 children born to her mother. She nursed many women who suffered from miscarriage or illness during their pregnancies and prayed for the soul of every lost child. Lord of Life we join with Catherine in prayer for families who suffer the pain of miscarriage and grieve the loss oF children.  May their souls find peace, and may they find union with their lost children in the kingdom of Heaven. We ask this through Jesus, your Son, in the unity of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

Concluding Prayer
Our Father
Hail Mary
Glory Be
St Catherine of Siena, pray for us.

 

 

 

May 4

Loving and Faithful God, we praise your glory in the devoted life of the St. Catherine of Siena, Dominican, virgin, and Doctor of the Church.  Catherine’s parents sought to have her marry, but she persisted in her desire to serve God as the first Dominican Associate member. Grant us the strength to respond to the Spirit’s call in our lives and to persist on our vocations to serve God and God’s people. Lord of Mission, through Catherine’s intercession hear our prayer. St. Catherine is the patroness of those who suffer resistance to what they embrace. We pray for all those who suffer oppression and violence because of their belief. We ask this through Jesus, your Son, in the unity of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

Concluding Prayer
Our Father
Hail Mary
Glory Be
St Catherine of Siena, pray for us.

 

May 5
Loving and Faithful God, we praise your glory in the dedicated life of the St. Catherine of Siena, Dominican, virgin and Doctor of the Church. Help us, like St. Catherine, to pass with pure heart and spirit through the chaos and confusion this world so often presents.  Help us to remain faithful in our relationship with You and to always discern our next thought/decision/act in the light of your presence and unconditional love. As the patroness of those struggling with temptation, we ask for St. Catherine’s prayers. May we faithfully follow our vocations to consecrated religious life, single life, or to the sacrament of marriage, and find strength and fortitude as we discern and respond to our call from the God of Love. We ask this through Jesus, your Son, in the unity of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

Concluding Prayer
Our Father
Hail Mary
Glory Be
St Catherine of Siena, pray for us.

 

 


May 6
Loving and Faithful God, we praise your glory in the hope-filled and unifying life of the St. Catherine of Siena, Dominican, virgin, and Doctor of the Church. In troubled times within the Church. She used the power of the pen and the power of prayer to counteract strife, to unite the faithful and Church leadership, and to restore the Papacy to Rome. Lord of All,  as Catherine worked to heal divisions within the Church, let us also be ministers of Peace within the Church of today. As we take part in the Synod of the Church, let us, with the entire People of God, discern together how to move forward on the path towards being a more synodal Church in the long-term. We ask this through Jesus, your Son, in the unity of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

Concluding Prayer
Our Father
Hail Mary
Glory Be
St Catherine of Siena, pray for us.

 

Posted in Seasonal Observances

In the Steps of St. Dominic: The Founding of Dominican Women in the United States

Articles by Marilyn Rhodes, OPA

This article is the first of in a series of twelve, one per month, celebrating the Bicentennial of Dominican Women in the United States.

St. Dominic was a traveling friar who shared his deep contemplation of the Gospel with others through his preaching. His Order of Preachers (OP) was formally designated by Pope Honorius III in 1218. Dominic wanted the friars, and soon the sisters of the order, to preach the truth of the Catholic faith. By his example, men and women Dominicans live in community and preach through their active involvement with others.

Angela Sansbury, the first elected Dominican Prioress in the United States

In the early years of our nation, many Catholic families migrated to Kentucky from Maryland in the late 1700s, and most settled in areas where they could continue to practice their faith. Central Kentucky became known as the new Holy Land as Catholic monasteries, convents, and schools sprang up around the area. By 1798, the little log church of St. Ann in Washington County was established. The parish quickly grew too large for this building, and on Christmas Day 1809, Dominican Fathers Fenwick, Wilson, and Tuite, blessed and opened a much larger brick church, St. Rose of Lima, just two miles away.

St. Rose of Lima provided spiritual care for twenty-three hundred souls and became the cradle for Dominican Friars in the United States. These friars founded the first seminary in the United States, a school for boys, the first Catholic college west of the Alleghenies, then turned to women to join the mission of the Dominicans.

In February 1822, Father Wilson invited young women to form a community of Dominican Sisters; nine women became candidates. On Easter Sunday, 1822, seven of these women, including Mariah Sansbury, who took the religious name Angela, were formally received into the Order of Preachers. Angela Sansbury was the first woman in the United States to receive the habit, and she, like those others who entered religious life that day, was part of a group unique in the Dominican order. These Nuns were not cloistered behind convent walls like their Sisters in Europe but called to lead active lives in their community and share the mission of the Dominican Friars – to respond to the needs of the world and the time.

In August, six more women joined the order. Their first mission would be to follow the prayer schedule of the friars and instruct girls. These pioneer women began their lives as Dominican Sisters in a log cabin named Bethany on the grounds of the Saint Rose Farm belonging to the Friars. This new community took the name of the Convent of St. Mary Magdalen, and Father Wilson appointed Judith McMan, a married woman from Cork, Ireland, as superior over the first candidates.

It was soon after that the Sisters moved to the Sienna Vale, near Cartwright Creek. Angela Sansbury and her blood sister Elizabeth, who entered religious life with the name  Benven, were the beneficiaries of their mother’s estate, which of course was passed on to the Community. These assets included land, a large log cabin, a still house, and farm animals, which the Sisters raised to help support the fledgling Congregation.

On January 6, 1823, Sister Angela Sansbury became the first woman in the United States to receive the habit as a Sister of the Dominican Order. Six months later, she was installed as the constitutionally elected Prioress of the Dominican Sisters in the United States.

 

 

Posted in News, Seasonal Observances

Catholic Sisters Week 2022 – Caring for Earth, Caring for You.

The Dominican Sisters of Peace have signed on to the Laudato Si Action Platform, a collaboration between the Vatican and the people of God intended to support and empower families, communities and institutions to achieve total sustainability.

But our dedication to caring for Earth is not new. Care for God’s creation is reflected in our Constitution:

  • We honor the integrity of the natural world and affirm our roles as stewards of God’s creation…

our Congregational Commitments:

  • (We) foster God’s web of life personally, communally, and ministerially by advocating and supporting just policies and decisions to reduce the impact of global climate change.

and our Congregational Corporate Stances:

  • The Dominican Sisters and Associates of Peace are committed to reducing the impact of global climate change. We support actions, programs and legislation on all levels to protect Earth’s climate, with particular concern for the negative impact affecting the lives of the poor. 

As we celebrate Catholic Sisters’ Week, March 8-14, we also celebrate the ways that our Sisters and Ministries have protected and cared for God’s glorious creation through our 200 years here in the United States. Each day during this Catholic Sisters Week, we celebrate the goals of the Laudato Si Action Plan and how our Sisters care for our Common Home.

Tuesday, March 8:  We Respond to the Cry of the Earth

Visitors can safely walk through the wetlands to view a variety of native plants.
Meditation trails are designed to protect the environment while offering an educational opportunity for hikers.

Nestled on the edge of the fast-growing city of Columbus, OH, with rows of houses to one side and a thriving business thoroughfare on the other, Shepherd’s Corner Ecology Center is a 160-acre green space, a haven for wildlife and native flora, and an oasis of nature in the middle of urban sprawl.
As this mid-western capital city continues to expand, Shepherd’s Corner Ecology Center will remain a place where natural life can grown and flourish, and where the city’s residents can enjoy God’s precious creation.
Shepherd’s Corner’s recycled Barn, powered in part by on-site solar panels, is home to numerous ecological and eco-spirituality programs

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, March 9: Ecological Economics

Cows at St. Catharine Farm are fed fresh grass, corn and hay grown on the farm, reducing the use of fossil fuels in transportation.
The farm’s barn uses the cow’s waste to help produce heat, then it is collected for fertilizer.

Ecological Economics acknowledges that the economy is a sub-system of human society, which itself is embedded within the biosphere–our common home. One way to meet this goal is to enact sustainable production and consumption.
St. Catharine Farm, owned by the Dominican Sisters of Peace for 200 years, is a model of sustainable production and a teaching farm for cattle farmers around the world.
In cooperation with local colleges and universities, St. Catharine Farm makes use of both the most modern and some of the oldest methods of sustainable farming, from erosion control, to the types of feed provided, to barns that re-use animal waste to create heat. All beef produced is antibiotic-, steroid-, and hormone free – and is made available for local sale.

Thursday, March 10: Response to the Cry of the Poor

Sr. Rachel Sena, OP, provided food gift cards to families in the indigenous Tohono O’odham nation during foot shortages in 2020.
Sr. Esther Calderon, OP, volunteers with women and children at Casa Alitas, a diocesan shelter for migrants released by ICE.

The majority of the 30.7 million people who became refugees in 2020 were driven by climate events. Sr. Rachel Sena is the Director of Religious Education and Detention Ministry at the Mission Diocese of Tucson, in a state that borders Mexico. In her ministry, she serves both refugees fleeing climate change and disasters in Central and South America and the indigenous Tohono O’odham Nation, which suffered to regain its water rights for nearly four decades. Her ministry recognizes the desperate plight of the poor who feel that even Earth has turned against them, as they try to survive droughts, fires and floods.

Sr. Esther Calderon, also in Tucson, serves as a volunteer at Casa Alitas, a diocesan shelter for migrants released by ICE, and at the Eloy ICS Detention Center in Eloy, AZ. Sr. Esther is also involved in No More Deaths, a humanitarian organization that works to reduce the deaths of migrants in the desert. In more than 50% of cases, Border Patrol did not conduct a confirmed search or rescue mobilization for migrants reported missing.A number of Dominican Sisters of Peace have served at Annunciation House in El Paso, TX, assisting asylum seekers as they enter the country.

 

Friday, March 11: Adoption of Sustainable Lifestyles

Sr. Claire McGowan, OP, created a free curb-side recycling program.
Sr. Claire McGowan and other faith leaders deliver a petition protesting a dangerous gas line.

In 2005, Sr. Claire McGowan founded the first rural county sustainability office in the state of Kentucky: New Pioneers for a Sustainable Future. From a bartered office space on a shoestring budget, this citizen-run civic organization created a free curbside-pickup recycling program; a green home program, and sustainability study groups that involved local farmers and business people to ensure community buy-in. As an eco-activist, Sr. Claire helped to prevent the construction of a gas pipeline and a state highway through the Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest.
All ministries of the Dominican Sisters of Peace, from Motherhouses where our Sisters live to our colleges and even our health care centers, practice sustainability through recycling, intelligent building design and energy use, the use of fuel efficient vehicles for ministry use and more.

Saturday, March 12: Ecological Education

Children learn about the organisms that live in the soil at Crown Point’s Science Camp.
Families can get closer to their food at “pick your own” patches.

If the way to a person’s heart is through their stomach, Crown Point Ecology Center in Bath, OH, may have found the same path to the brain. The farm’s annual Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program supplies local families with fresh certified organic and sustainably grown vegetables, herbs, and berries, supplemented by family educational opportunities Pick Your Own patches and a weekly newsletter that teaches families how to prepare their fresh foods in a way that is healthy and sustainable.
Every year, hundreds of children participate in Crown Point’s Summer Farm & Science Camp, with weekly themes that teach about plants, animals, and even indigenous culture. The classes are all taught in the Center’s “living classroom” – 115-acres of diverse ecosystems and habitats.
Crown Point also offers Organic Farm Internships, where students learn the most practical applications of ecology – feeding a hungry population while caring for Earth.
All ecological ministries of the Dominican Sisters of Peace offer programs in ecological education. 

 

Heartland Farm’s herd of alpacas provides wood for weaving as well as a natural fertilizer for vegetable gardens.

March 13: Ecological Spirituality

The high tunnel growing space at Heartland Farm allows for a longer and more productive growing season without the use of chemicals.

Ecological Spirituality springs from a profound ecological conversion and helps us to “discover God in all things.” That is the belief of the community at Heartland Farm in Pawnee Rock, Kansas.  The community’s Sisters, staff, and volunteers revere the created universe as both a revelation of and an intimate expression of the Divine. While a number of the farm’s learning events have been curtailed by the pandemic, customized eco-spirituality events allow small groups to integrate the beauty and generosity of nature withGod’s love through working the land or by working with what has been grown on the land, through cooking, weaving, or clay work. Even weeding and tilling, or as the Community calls it, Ora et Labora, Work and Prayer, is an act of contemplation and worship of the God who has given us all good things. 

 

March 14: Community Resilience and Empowerment

High school students learn about saving and borrowing at a Rising Youth meeting.
Dominican Learning Center learner Selene has finished her GED and is studying for her citizenship exam.

Building a more peaceful community starts with providing the tools to work for peace! Since 2011, The Dominican Sisters of Peace and their ministries at the Martin de Porres Center and the Dominican Learning Center have offered a violence prevention program reaching out to Latinx families in Columbus, OH. This program reaches out to families with tools and resources for emotional and economic resiliency, including ESL and other educational opportunities, citizenship assistance, and family financial literacy. Youth programs assist with school work as well as empower young people to speak up against behaviors that promote violence, combat toxic masculinity, encourage girls’ empowerment, and address mental health challenges that can lead to violence.

Please give to support our ministries that support the care of Creation and care of God’s people. 

Posted in News, Seasonal Observances

Celebrating Catholic Sisters Week, March 8-14, 2022

As part of the celebration of Catholic Sisters Week March 8 – 14, 2022, we will focus on the theme “Caring for Earth, Caring for You.Sisters and Associates who would like to participate are invited to:

  1. Select a day to celebrate
  2. Wear something green (e.g. a ribbon, a scarf, a shirt, etc.)
  3. Do one or more of the following:
    • In prayer and contemplation become more aware of your connection to creation
    • Endeavor to live in communion with nature and all creatures by spending some part of the day outside
    • Take an inventory of your consumption and consider making changes
    • Seek reusable options over disposable ones
    • Be mindful of your use of water
    • Recycle & repurpose when you can
    • Advocate for environmental justice with letters to the editor, legislators, etc. about issues in your locale

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Seasonal Observances

The Season of Advent

Pray with the Dominican Sisters of Peace During the Season of Advent

 

Happy Advent, Happy New Year: A message from Sr. Pat Twohill and the Dominican Sisters of Peace

The First Sunday of Advent

The Second Sunday of Advent

The Third Sunday of Advent

The Fourth Sunday of Advent

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Join the Dominican Sisters of Peace As We Light the Candles of the Advent Wreath

 

Click here to view the Dominican Sisters of Peace Facebook Page

The First Sunday of Advent
Dominican Sisters of Peace
House of Welcome, New Haven, CT

The Second Sunday of Advent
Collaborative Dominican Novitiate
Chicago, IL

The Third Sunday of Advent
Dominican Sisters of Peace
House of Welcome, Columbus, OH

 

The Fourth Sunday of Advent
Dominican Sisters of Peace
Welcoming Community, South Bend, IN

 

 

Pray the O Antiphons with the Dominican Sisters of Peace

On Dec. 17, the church’s liturgy begins the “O” antiphons which are ancient refrains dating to the eighth century. Each day until Dec. 23, a different “O” antiphon is sung at Mass and in the church’s Evening Prayer. The antiphons weave biblical imagery from the Hebrew Scriptures into a lovely theological tapestry celebrating the messianic titles of Jesus and what they might mean — yesterday, today and tomorrow.

These messianic titles are respectively, O Sapientia (O Wisdom), O Adonai (O Lord/Leader), O Radix Jesse (O Root of Jesse), O Clavis David (O Key of David), O Oriens (O Radiant Dawn/Dayspring), O Rex Gentium (O King of the Nations), O Emmanuel (O God-With-Us).
From Global Sisters Report

December 17 – O Wisdom

December 18 – O Adonai

December 19 – O Flower of Jesse’s Stem

December 20 – O Key of David

December 21 – O Radiant Dawn

December 22 – O King of All Nations

December 23 – O Emmanuel

 

 

 

Posted in Seasonal Observances